Bone, Joint & Spine
Treatments to relieve pain and increase mobility
Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time. Although osteoarthritis can damage any joint in your body, the disorder most commonly affects joints in your hands, knees, hips and spine. Osteoarthritis symptoms can usually be effectively managed, although the underlying process cannot be reversed. Staying active, maintaining a healthy weight and other treatments may slow progression of the disease and help improve pain and joint function.

Calcaneal Spur

A Calcaneal spur, or commonly known as a heel spur, occurs when a bony outgrowth forms on the heel bone. Calcaneal spurs can be located at the back of the heel (dorsal heel spur) or under the sole (plantar heel spur). Heel spurs can be located at the back of the heel or under the heel, beneath the sole of the foot. Heel spurs at the back of the heel are frequently associated with inflammation of the Achilles tendon (tendinitis) and cause tenderness and pain at the back of the heel made worse while pushing off the ball of the foot.

Lumbar canal stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis is a lower back condition whereby either the spinal canal or one or more of the vertebral foramina becomes narrowed. Lumbar spinal stenosis is typically caused by degenerative arthritis. Patients can develop low back pain as well as pain, weakness, and numbness or decreased sensation in the legs. Some people with spinal stenosis may not have symptoms. Others may experience pain, tingling, numbness and muscle weakness. Symptoms can worsen over time.

Osteomalacia

Osteomalacia refers to a marked softening of your bones, most often caused by severe vitamin D deficiency. The softened bones of children and young adults with osteomalacia can lead to bowing during growth, especially in weight-bearing bones of the legs. Osteomalacia in older adults can lead to fractures. Osteomalacia differs from the more-common condition of having a low vitamin D level. Osteomalacia also differs from osteoporosis, which causes bone thinning.

Cervical Spondylosis:

Cervical spondylosis is a common, age-related condition that affects the joints and discs in your cervical spine, which is in your neck. It's also known as cervical osteoarthritis or neck arthritis. It develops from wear and tear of cartilage and bones. While it's largely due to age, it can be caused by other factors as well. Poor posture might also play a role in the development of spinal changes that result in cervical spondylosis.

Lumbar Disc Disease (Herniated Disc)

Degenerative disk disease is when normal changes that take place in the disks of your spine causes pain. Spinal disks are like shock absorbers between the vertebrae, or bones, of your spine. They help your back stay flexible, so you can bend and twist. As you get older, they can show signs of wear and tear. They begin to break down and may not work as well. As the disk continues to break down, or with continued stress on the spine, the inner nucleus pulposus may actually rupture out from the annulus. This is a ruptured, or herniated, disk. The fragments of disc material can then press on the nerve roots located just behind the disk space. This can cause pain, weakness, numbness, or changes in sensation. Most disk herniations happen in the lower lumbar spine, especially between the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae and between the fifth lumbar vertebra and the first sacral vertebra (the L4-5 and L5-S1 levels).

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that occurs when the body loses too much bone, makes too little bone, or both. As a result, bones become weak and may break from a fall or, in serious cases, from sneezing or minor bumps. Osteoporosis means "porous bone." Viewed under a microscope, healthy bone looks like a honeycomb. When osteoporosis occurs, the holes and spaces in the honeycomb are much larger than in healthy bone. Osteoporotic bones have lost density or mass and contain abnormal tissue structure. As bones become less dense, they weaken and are more likely to break.

Lumbar spondylosis

Lumbar spondylosis is a degenerative condition that develops gradually over time, being more common in older individuals. This condition can also be referred to as spinal osteoarthritis. It occurs due to the wear-and-tear of the bones that happens from normal everyday movement. The lower spine is composed of disc-like structures that are cushioned by soft gel-like sections in between them.

Sciatica

Sciatica, No more!

The sharp, shooting pain of sciatica is enough to take your breathe away. Treat the numbing pain before it gets worse.

The term sciatica describes the symptoms of leg pain—and possibly tingling, numbness, or weakness—that originate in the lower back and travel through the buttock and down the large sciatic nerve in the back of each leg. Sciatica is often characterized by one or more of the following symptoms Constant pain in only one side of the buttock or leg. Leg pain that is often described as burning, tingling, or searing. Weakness, numbness, or difficulty moving the leg, foot, and/or toes. A sharp pain that may make it difficult to stand up or walk. Pain that radiates down the leg and possibly into the foot and toes.